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Texas

Photo by Kim Grant

Texas destinations

Amarillo

Austin

Beaumont

Big Bend National Park

Corpus Christi

Dallas

Fort Worth

Galveston

Houston

Marfa and West Texas

San Antonio

South Padre Island

Texas Hill Country

Texas

Of all the generalizations you’ll hear about Texas, there’s only one that always holds true: it’s big. If Texas were a country, it would be the fortieth largest in the world—which means there’s room for it to be pretty much whatever you want it to be. There are wide, open spaces and jam-packed cities, pretty beach towns and sprawling ranchland. There’s even a national park that’s almost as big as Rhode Island. So saddle up for whatever adventure suits you best: the Lone Star state is ready to ride.


Amarillo

Route 66 road trip staple
Way up yonder in the Panhandle sits Amarillo, Texas’ only major stop along historic Route 66 and home of tourist stalwarts Cadillac Ranch and The Big Texan Steak Ranch. Amarillo is also popular among outdoor enthusiasts as the gateway to Palo Duro Canyon State Park, the second largest canyon in the U.S. after the Grand Canyon.


Austin

Live music and lots of love
When it comes to Texas stereotypes, the state capital of Austin bucks them all. You won’t find cowboys or a slow-paced way of life, but you will find live music and plenty of it, a tech boom that’s been going strong for over a decade, and an indie spirit that makes it one of the most sought-after (and fun!) cities in the United States. South Congress is at the heart of the action, but you can find a million ways to chill all over town.


Beaumont

The town that oil built
A port city 80 miles east of Houston, Beaumont is a former cowtown that boomed when oil was discovered there in the Lucas Gusher in 1901. Since the town was built mostly on natural resources, it’s no surprise that the main attractions are museums like the Texas Energy Museum or the Spindletop-Gladys City Boomtown Museum. Its quirky claim to fame? The World’s Largest Fire Hydrant at the Fire Museum of Texas.


Big Bend National Park

Discover the vastness of nature
The enormous Big Bend National Park covers 1,252 square miles and is a good exploration into the notion of the word “big.” The Chisos Basin is the heart of the park, surrounded by the Chisos Mountains and some of the park’s most beautiful hikes. You can raft your way down the Rio Grande — the river that forms the border between the US and Mexico — or explore the arid climate of the Chihuahuan Desert.


Corpus Christi

Explore the Gulf Coast
Sunny Corpus sits right on the coast, offering a breezy respite from the heat and humidity you’ll find inland. Just over the causeway, Mustang Island and Padre Island National Seashore beckon beachgoers and windsurfers. In town, check out the Texas State Aquarium or the USS Lexington Museum, a 900-foot-long aircraft carrier.


Dallas

Bright lights, big city
Glittery Dallas is Texas’ most sophisticated city, with all the fancy-pants shopping and dining you could ever hope for. It’s also home to the flourishing downtown Arts District that includes multiple museums and performance spaces. History buffs and conspiracy theorists should not miss the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, which takes an in-depth look at the Kennedy assassination in 1963.


Fort Worth

‘Where the West Begins’
The Old West lives in Fort Worth’s historic Stockyards District, where you’ll find western-themed saloons, hotels and shops—as well as a daily cattle drive right down the middle of the street. It’s a lot of fun, especially for the kids, and adults can find their own fun at Billy Bob’s, the world’s largest honky-tonk. If you fill up on the Western shtick, head to the excellent Kimbell Art Museum or the Amon Carter Museum of American Art.


Galveston

Victorian charm at the beach
Just an hour or so from Houston, sweet little Galveston could easily end up just another Texas beach town, but its historic homes from the late 19th century give it a special charm. Take a horse drawn carriage through The Strand and check out the Grand 1884 Opera House, take a boat tour or go deep-sea fishing, then hit the beach or grab some seafood at one of the many local restaurants.


Houston

A big city with all the trappings
Seemingly made up entirely of concrete and steel, Houston sprawls for miles and miles. There’s big money here, and lots of places to spend it, from the restaurants headed by celebrity chefs to the chic boutiques and upscale shopping malls. The upside of all that wealth? A well-funded arts scene, with excellent theaters and the Houston Museum District.


Marfa and West Texas

Discoveries in the desert
West Texas is the land of wide, open spaces. Along I-10 there’s not much to look at—just scrub brush and open skies—but dip below the interstate and you’ll find some fascinating small towns, like Marfa, an unlikely epicenter of modern art, and Fort Davis, where you can attend a late night star party at McDonald Observatory. In the far west corner of the state, El Paso offers some excellent free museums and all the Tex-Mex you can eat.


San Antonio

The intersection of arts, culture and history
The seventh largest city in the US, San Antonio has all the shopping, dining, theme parks, and sports that you could ever hope for. It’s also home to the most visited and most beloved attraction in the entire state of Texas: The Alamo, a historical site and shrine to the men who fought for Texas’ independence. Running through downtown is the Riverwalk, a lovely, European-style canal lined with bars and restaurants.


South Padre Island

A low-key beach destination
The favored spring break destination for students all over the state, family-friendly South Padre Island beckons with warm water, laid-back locals and 34 miles worth of clean, sandy beaches. (Not to mention plenty of beer.) Go horseback riding on the beach, fish from Jim’s Pier, try your hand at windsurfing, build sand castles or just cultivate a deep, dark tan. Visit the lighthouse at nearby Port Isabel, or go bird watching at Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge.


Texas Hill Country

The slow pace of small-town life
Ready to escape all the hubbub of city life and discover some of Texas’ best small towns? Head to Texas Hill Country: Lockhart for some of the state’s best barbecue, tiny Luckenbach for live music behind the general store (circa 1851), Fredericksburg for antique stores and B&Bs or Llano for hiking at Enchanted Rock. In the springtime, the roads are lined with flowers, thanks to the efforts of Lady Bird Johnson who made her home in Johnson City with LBJ.


Where To Go

Amarillo

Austin

Beaumont

Big Bend National Park

Corpus Christi

Dallas

Fort Worth

Galveston

Houston

Marfa and West Texas

San Antonio

South Padre Island

Texas Hill Country

What it Costs

Abstract Pricing at a Glance

Prices often fluctuate dynamically depending on capacity, seasonality and deals. We don’t want to lead you astray by quoting exact prices
that quickly become wrong. To give you a rough idea for budgetary planning purposes, though, we have indicated general price ranges for all points of interest.

Price ranges are quoted in $US.

See & Do
N/A => Not applicable
Free
$ => Tickets less than $10 per person
$$ => Tickets $11-25 per person
$$$ => Tickets $26 per person

Sleep
$ => Rooms less than $100 for a double
$$ => Rooms $200 for a double
$$$ => Rooms $300 for a double

Eat
$ => $1-15 per person for a meal (without alcohol, tax, tip)
$ => $16-40 per person for a meal (without alcohol, tax, tip)
$$$ => $41 per person for a meal (without alcohol, tax, tip)

Shop
N/A => Not applicable

Tours
$ => Tickets less than $10 per person
$$ => Tickets $11-25 per person
$$ => Tickets $26 per person